WHO I AM

QUALIFICATIONS

PERSONAL TRAINER                              - ACCREDITED BY THE REGISTRY OF EXERCISE PROFESSIONALS

NUTRITIONAL THERAPIST                       - REGULATED BY THE BRITISH ASSOCIATION OF NUTRITIONAL THERAPY

GYM INSTRUCTOR                               - ACCREDITED BY THE REGISTRY OF EXERCISE PROFESSIONALS

 

Don't just take my word for it - hear the feedback straight from my clients.

 

SUMMARY

Hello! My Name's Alex. I'm half Iranian, half Polish and was born and raised in London.

I've helped over 50 people reach their goals, which mainly focus on weight loss, muscle building or boxing

I'm naturally mild-mannered and, although my clients work hard for their results, I maintain a relaxed and encouraging attitude.

Outside of proven results, I'm most rewarded by helping people change their relationship with exercise.

 

Clients are often surprised that they find themselves looking forward to training for the first time. It's a pleasure to hear, and something I try to help everyone experience.

Personal Trainer standing in a white nike t shirt.

BIOGRAPHY

I was not a sporty child. I was tall, and my lungs couldn't keep up.

What classmates could do easily, I couldn't accomplish. I would fall behind, gasping. I would fall so far behind that I was forgotten. The exercise curriculum was, quite literally, a lonely experience. I felt my lungs drowning, and I felt embarrassed as it happened.

yogaweblow.jpg

I remember dismissal and disengagement. Coaches had finished explaining - or even begun - the next activity when I trudged to the finish.  

I was six years old when I decided exercise was a battle of will.

melow2.jpg

As a teenager, I liked the idea of punching things. This is still the case. That was a joke. Well, not exactly, I still like punching things - I just didn't want that to sound too solemn. It was meant to be funny.

My lungs caught up and my coordination improved. I was in decent shape when I stumbled into a boxing gym - a special boxing gym.

Time passed, and something occurred to me. I knew how to win battles, but did everything need to be a battle? In fact, did anything need to be a battle?

I was creating unpleasant situations, and finding pleasure in the moments they were conquered. To achieve satisfaction, I was making my perception of events an unfavourable one - then pushing through. I was working against myself.

This exercise mentality is echoed in life. Have you ever found yourself awake late at night - reluctant to sleep and sacrifice the only time you feel nothing is expected of you?

 

Yet, we go through the motions, so long as we can reach that comfort the next day. Now, I train differently. No matter what sensation I'm experiencing, I make it a positive event. That's where I derive my strength - and my happiness.

option-3low.jpg

I'm taking pleasure in the process, in both life and training. I'm stronger - in every way - than I've ever been before. Our broader attitudes are reflected in how we handle one of our most primal scenarios - physical demands placed upon us. Exercise shifts mentalities and changes lives. I look forward to enjoying it with you.

​It was run by Barry, a former Royal Marine Drill Sergeant. His objective was simple: replicate as closely as possible the troop physical training regimen. In classes, he'd recite mantras:

"Do not be weak. Do not be pathetic. If you stop now, you are demonstrating a trait known as 'weakness'. 'Weakness' gets you nowhere in life. Keep going until your eyeballs bleed."


I flourished here. The mentality fell exactly in line with the attitude I had cultivated as a child. Reduced to a simple choice, it was 'strength or weakness?'

This mindset caused me to push, and push distinctly. Members of the public would cheer for me when I trained outdoors.  I had no interest in weakness, I kept going - until my eyeballs were bloodshot. In time, I was invited to private training circuits, reserved for professional fighters. I matched them in fitness - and still do.